V.A. Ferdinand Rebay: Violin and Guitar Sonatas / Viola and Guitar Sonata (2015)

Artist: Pedro Mateo Gonzalez, Jose Manuel Alvarez, Joaquin Riquelme
Title Of Album: Ferdinand Rebay: Violin and Guitar Sonatas / Viola and Guitar Sonata
Year Of Release: 2015
Label: Eudora
Genre: Classical
Quality: 320 KBPS
Total Time: 66:15 min
Total Size: 151 MB

01 – Sonata in E minor for Violin and Guitar – I. Allegro ma non troppo
02 – Sonata in E minor for Violin and Guitar – II. Variationen über ein kärntner Volkslied
03 – Sonata in E minor for Violin and Guitar – III. Menuetto
04 – Sonata in E minor for Violin and Guitar – IV. Rondo (Finale)
05 – Sonata in C minor for Violin and Guitar – I. Mässiges Marschtempo
06 – Sonata in C minor for Violin and Guitar – II. Variationen über “Und der Hans schleicht umher”
07 – Sonata in C minor for Violin and Guitar – III. Scherzo
08 – Sonata in C minor for Violin and Guitar – IV. Ein fröhliches “perpetuum mobile”
09 – Sonata in D minor for Viola and Guitar – I. Sehr mässig bewegt
10 – Sonata in D minor for Viola and Guitar – II. Sehr ruhig und zart
11 – Sonata in D minor for Viola and Guitar – III. Scherzo
12 – Sonata in D minor for Viola and Guitar – IV. Rondo

The rediscovery of the prolific output of music for guitar by Ferdinand Rebay (1880-1953), of which some outstanding examples appear on this album, has made a huge impact on the repertoire —a rare occurrence in the history of any musical instrument. His catalogue of over 400 works featuring the guitar, from solo pieces —including seven exceptional sonatas— to Lieder and choral works with guitar accompaniment, via a wide range of chamber music, has been revealed as a treasure-house of riches. The value of his legacy rests not only on its (probably unparalleled) size, but on the fact that it fills the gap in the repertoire that would otherwise have been left by Central European Romanticism.
Rebay’s style is highly sophisticated, indebted to a tradition that goes back to Schubert, Brahms and Wagner, and the polar opposite to that of his contemporaries of the Second Viennese School, whose work so dominates our perceptions of the music history of that period. While Schoenberg claimed he was ensuring «the hegemony of German music» by making a clean break with the past, Rebay was more than happy to draw on that existing tradition. Had he stayed within the bounds of convention, he might simply have become an inferior successor to Brahms —instead, however, he stands out for having established his own unique style.

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